TECHNICAL REPORTS

This evaluation report recognizes ET&F pneumatic pins used to attach wood structural panel sheathing to cold formed steel framing of 20ga to 10ga thickness for horizontal diaphragm construction. Withdrawal and lateral strength design values are also provided for individual pins.

 

» to IAPOMO UES ER-335

 

This evaluation report recognizes the use of ET&F AGS series pins for use attaching wood panel sheathing to cold formed steel for use in shear wall assemblies used to resist seismic loads.

 

» to ICC ESR-1777 Report

 

This report recognizes the use of ET&F pneumatic fasteners used to attach fiber cement HardiePanel® siding, manufactured by the James Hardie Building Products, to light gauge steel framing. 

 

» to ICC ESR-1844 Report 

This report recognizes the use of ET&F pneumatic fasteners used to attach fiber cement HardiePlank® siding, manufactured by the James Hardie Building Products, to light gauge steel framing and to concrete masonry units.>

 

» to ICC ESR-2290 Report

 

Gypsum sheathing, Dens-Glass® Gold gypsum board, or fiber-reinforced gypsum panels such as Fiberock® brand sheathing are attached to steel framing members using ET&F Panelfast® knurled AGS-100 series pneumatic fasteners.

 

» to ICC ESR-2398 Report

 

 

This evaluation report recognizes AKN-100 series and AGS-100 series pins for use fastening James Hardie Brand fiber cement siding to steel studs and ASM-144 series pins for use attaching James Hardie Brand fiber cement siding direct to concrete masonry units. Included in this report are evaluation reports with design loads as well as product installation instructions.

 

» Read the full report

This technical paper by Reynaud Serrette, Ph.D. and David P. Nolan, P.E. was published in the August, 2009 edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers' Journal of Structural Engineering. This paper presents detailed findings of an experimental program that evaluated the performance of shear wall assemblies in which wood panels were fastened to steel studs with pneumatically driven pins manufactured by ET&F Fastening Systems, Inc. The results show the walls have significant displacement capacity and the design values were primarily governed by the drift requirements in the building code.

 

This new research confirms that ET&F's steel pins meet the seismic criteria of the 2006 International Building Code and offer an effective and efficient alternative to screws.

 

With the adoption of the 2006 IBC in California, ICC Evaluation Services established new criteria for assignment of the seismic response factor ”R” of 6.5 for lateral force-resisting elements to be recognized for use in light frame shear wall buildings. Dr. Serrette explains ”The three new criteria are in addition to existing code requirements. The primary focus of the new criteria is on displacement capacity. This research shows walls assembled using ET&F pins meet and exceed both the code requirements and the new ICC-ES criteria.”

 

The Journal of Structural Engineering reports on fundamental knowledge that contributes to the state of the art and state of the practice in structural engineering. Published papers undergo a rigorous review and technical evaluation process by both journal editors and independent experts.

 

» Read a summary of the report at the ASCE website.

An authorized reprint of the complete copyrighted report is available by request on ET&F's Contact Us page.

Wood based panels for shear wall and horizontal diaphragms have traditionally been attached to cold formed steel framing using tapping screws. To increase the speed of installation and to reduce the amount of labor used making these attachments, pneumatic nailing systems have been introduced. These products allow wood based panels to be fastened to steel in a manner similar to which panels have been nailed to wood framing in the past. This Tech Note provides information on specifications, design procedures and field inspection of pneumatic drive pins.

 

 

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Wood based panels for shear wall and horizontal diaphragms have traditionally been attached to light gauge steel framing using self-drilling, tapping screws. With the introduction of pneumatic nailing systems, wood based panels can now be fastened to steel in a manner similar to which panels have been nailed to wood framing in the past. Information on specifications, selection, and field inspection of pneumatic drive pins is contained in Technical Note F300-09. This Technical Note contains procedures for the design of connections using pneumatically driven pins.

 

» Read the full report

 

Moisture, airborne chemicals and pollutants all can combine to reduce the life of ferrous fasteners through corrosion. This Tech Note examines the corrosion process, available fastener finishes, methods of measuring corrosion and the relative durability of finishes.

 

» Read the full report